CLARE BOOTHE LUCE'S

THE WOMEN

Directed by Lane Savadove

 

CAST

 

Mary..................................Melanie Julian*

Silvia............................Mary Lee Bednarek

Edith...............................Genvieve Perrier*

Nancy..................................Karina Balfour

Peggy........................................Lee Minora

Countess..................................Rebecca Joy

Morehead........................Cheryl Williams*

Lucy.......................................Liz Hostetter

 

* Actors appearing with permission of Actors' Equity Association


Sponsored by Rowan University College of Performing Arts

Performance Dates
March 3- March 20

 

Performances at:
The Latvian Society, 

531 N 7th St, Philadelphia, PA 19123

 

Run Time:

TBA

 

Tickets:

  • Opening Night 3/4: $35

  • Wed-Thurs: $25

  • Fri, Sat, Sun: $32

  • Student: $12

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  • The Latvian Society is not fully handicap accessible. Please contact EgoPo with any assistance needs.

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Clare Boothe Luce’s comic masterpiece satirizes marriage through the eyes of an all-female cast.  This hilarious social critique of the pampered lives and power struggles of Manhattan socialites exposes the genuine emotions that lie concealed behind their artifice. This timeless classic ran for two years on Broadway in the 1930s and has been made into two feature films. Directed by EgoPo Artistic Director, Lane Savadove, The Women will feature an impressive ensemble of Philadelphia’s finest actresses paired with remarkable young performers from Rowan University’s College of Performing Arts.

 

THOUGHTS FROM DIRECTOR LANE SAVADOVE: “We are honoring women playwrights this season, but this doesn’t mean that we will just have stereotyped heroines. We want to show women in three dimensions…THE WOMEN, which I’m directing, is an entire play about awful women…It’s not a critique of the women themselves, but what traditional marriage can do to women’s interactions.  Traditionally, it is a capitalist system of purchase, of a man saying, ‘You give me your body and in exchange I’ll give you a ring and my wealth.’ A woman’s body is turned into an asset, and when her body is commodified, it will by definition depreciate, leading to the “trading in” for a younger, newer model. This system of power, and powerlessness, then leads to the world of this play, and it’s horrific, it makes the women behave horribly towards each other. This landscape makes it an exciting opportunity to collaborate with academia. Our association with Rowan University [where I teach and serves as head of acting and directing] enables us to do such a big show, and for the talented Rowan students, they can to take on big juicy roles while working alongside experienced professionals.” Click here for full article in Phindie.

 

HISTORY OF THE SHOW: The Women previewed for the public in “try-outs” right here in Philadelphia in 1936, then opened three weeks later on Broadway at the Ethel Barrymore Theatre. The Opening Night became one of the most celebrated gatherings of New York artistic elites, including Miss Barrymore herself, Irving Berlin, Gloria Swanson, Billy Rose and his wife, Fanny Brice, Max Gordon, the show’s producer, and Moss Hart and George S. Kaufman. The show ruffled many feathers, as it opened up women’s private lives on stage like never before, giving women bawdy power, language, and ferocity while critiquing the powerful elite. Overall, the public loved it and it became a hit, running for 657 performances.  The play was adapted for film, once in 1939 directed by George Cukor, and then again in 2008, starring Jada Pinkett Smith, Meg Ryan, Annette Bening, Debra Messing, Carrie Fischer, Bette Midler, and Candice Bergen.

 

THE PLAYWRIGHT: Clare Boothe Luce (1903-1987) was an American author and later a US Ambassador. She was the first American woman appointed to a major ambassadorial post abroad. She is best known for her 1936 hit play The Women.  Her mother’s initial plan was for her to become an actress, and she understudied Mary Pickford on Broadway at age 10. After a short marriage to a millionaire, she married Henry Luce, the founder of Time/Life Corp, and they became one of the great "power couples" of American history. Besides being a playwright, she wrote for Vogue and Vanity Fair, and was a war correspondent for Life. In 1942, Luce won a Republican seat in the United States House of Representatives and became an outspoken critic of FDR. She later became the ambassador to Italy appointed by Eisenhower. President Reagan awarded her the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1983.

 

Want to read more of Clare Boothe Luce’s work?
Kiss the Boys Goodbye (1938), Margin for Error (1939)

© 2015 by EgoPo Classic Theater. 

Theater Location: 531 North 7th Street, Philadelphia, PA 19123.

 

Office Location: 317 Dickinson Street, Philadelphia, PA 19147.

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